Sister of Christopher Alder says she still has nightmares over brother’s death in custody

Janet Alder protests in tears
Image Credit : Peter Marshall

source: Yorkshire Post
published: 28 November 2020

Falklands veteran Christopher Alder died in April 1998 after he was arrested for breaching the peace following a fracas outside a nightclub in which he was punched and taken to hospital.

CCTV showed officers drag the father-of-two’s motionless body into the custody suite where he was left handcuffed, gasping for breath, for 11 minutes before dying. No attempts were made to seek medical help, despite one officer expressing concerns about asphyxiation.

Audio footage from several officers that stood around the paratrooper as he lay in his final moments, recorded what is widely regarded to be monkey noises and racist slurs.

Continue reading

New evidence, fresh questions about death of young Black Londoner Rashan Charles

Rashan Charles
Rashan Charles – Image Credit Rashan Campaign

source: Open Democracy
published: 26 November 2020

Police claimed the man who helped an officer restrain and handcuff Rashan Charles was “a member of the public” with no police connection. CCTV evidence raises doubts. Shine A Light exclusive (distressing content).

Rashan Charles was a healthy young man out with friends in East London when a uniformed police officer from the elite Territorial Support Group chased him into a convenience store. Without any verbal warning, the officer grabbed Rashan from behind, threw him to the floor and heavily restrained him.

A second man assisted the officer. Rashan, who was unarmed and presented no threat, died on the floor of the Yours Locally shop on Hackney’s Kingsland Road in the early hours of 22 July 2017. He was 20 years old, the eldest of seven children and a father himself, his daughter coming up to her second birthday at the time.

Continue reading

Exclusions lead to criminalisation of London black working class

Youth Protesterssource: SalehMamon.com
published: 25 November 2020

It has been common knowledge for decades that black youth are disproportionately excluded from school permanently.

No significant progress has been made to significantly change this reality in spite of many reports. The most recent data show that black pupils are nearly four times more likely to be permanently excluded than their school peers.

The London case study by Jessica Perera of the Institute of Race Relations is ground breaking. It shows that exclusions and criminalisation of black working class youth are not isolated issues that should be confined to school level without relating them to wider social and political developments over five decades.

In response to the media and commentators who deliberately sensationalise serious black youth crime by projecting black youth as a menace and racialising it, Perera reviews the evidence thoroughly to present a more nuanced view.

Continue reading