Police restraint contributed to Leon Briggs death, jury finds

Leon Briggs vigil

source: The Guardian
published: 12 March 2021

The way in which police officers restrained a man with drug-induced psychosis “more than minimally” contributed to his death in Luton in 2013, an inquest jury in Milton Keynes has found by unanimous verdict.

Leon Briggs, a 39-year-old father of two of mixed ethnic background, was a lorry driver and also taught computer skills to older people. His family described him as “a loving brother and father, caring and genuine”.

He was detained under the Mental Health Act and taken to Luton police station on 4 November 2013. Briggs died about two hours later at Luton & Dunstable hospital as a result of “amphetamine intoxication in association with prone restraint and prolonged struggling”, with a secondary cause of heart disease, the senior coroner Emma Whitting has previously said.

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Landmark reform of mental health law is on the cards

Woman in prison cellsource: Gov.UK
published: 13 January 2021

The UK Government says that major reform of the Mental Health Act will empower individuals to have more control over their treatment and deliver on a key manifesto commitment.

People with mental health issues who are detained under the Mental Health Act will benefit from landmark reforms which provide more control over their care and treatment, the government has announced today.

Take part in the Public Consultation (click here)

The government want your views on changes to the Mental Health Act to help put patients at the center of decisions about their own care. This consultation closes at 11:59pm on 21 April 2021.

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‘Ingenuity’ programme to highlight creative arts of prison inmates

prison soap carving
Prison inmates soap carving

source: National Justice Museum
published: 9 November 2020

Michelle Hubbard, the Senior Creative Engagement Practitioner from the Nottingham based National Justice Museum, has asked us to circulate details of the project she is developing called ‘Ingenuity’, based around exploring an historic collection of beautiful objects crafted by people in prison.

Some of these objects will have been made in prison workshops, some will have been made illicitly with crude materials and items to hand. for example there are several beautifully made little soap carvings that the maker would have whittled away at (probably late at night) to fill the hours of emptiness and loneliness, using just their government issue soap ration, and maybe a finger nail or matchstick to carve it with.

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