Hundreds march in London for those who died in state custody

Scotland Solidarity with UFFC 2021 - Justice for Allan Marshall
Scotland shows solidarity with UFFC, 2021 – Image Credit Justice for Allan Marshall

source: PressTV
published: 31 October 2021

Hundreds of friends and relatives of people who died in prison or police custody in the UK have held a rally and remembrance procession through central London, calling for justice for their loved ones.

The rally, which is organized by the United Families & Friends Campaign, has taken place every year in London since 1999. The group is made up of bereaved families and others affected by deaths at the hands of United Kingdom police, in prisons, in immigration systems, and psychiatric custody.

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UFFC Annual Rally & Procession 2021

UFFC Annual Rally & Demo flyer 2021
Click image to view / download flyer

source: UFFC
published: 12 October 2021

Join us for this years annual remembrance procession which takes place in Central London on Saturday 30 October 2021.

The United Families and Friends Campaign (UFFC) mission is to work collaboratively as a network of independent campaigns to address common issues and concerns related to deaths and abuse in police, penal, mental health and immigration detention; and to organise events and activities that promote awareness and support for affected families across the UK. See Constitution here.

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Privacy International launches new guide to resisting high tech police surveillance

Free to Protest - Privacy-International-Guide promotional image
Image Credit : Privacy International

source: Netpol
published: 29 June 2021

This is a guest post by Harmit Kambo, Campaigns Director, Privacy International

Imagine going to a peaceful protest and having to show your ID to the police before you can join it. Or having to fill out a form about why you are attending that particular protest. Sounds absurd, right? Surely we should all be free to protest, without the police knowing who we are?

But high tech surveillance of protests is real, and it enables the police to identify, monitor and track protestors, indiscriminately and at scale.

For example, your face is increasingly becoming your ID card with the rapid development of facial recognition technology and its deployment at protests.

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