Risk factors for suicide in prisons: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Hands behind jail bars

source: The Lancet
published: 9 February 2021

Rates of suicide among people in prison are elevated compared with people of similar age and sex who are living in the community. Improving assessments and interventions to reduce suicide risk requires updated evidence on risk factors. We aimed to examine risk factors associated with suicide in prisoners.

Methods
We did an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of risk factors for suicide among people in prison. We searched five biblographic databases for articles published between Jan 1, 2006, and Aug 13, 2020, and one database for articles published between Jan 1, 1973, and Aug 13, 2020.

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Nursing Narratives Project : Racism and the pandemic

Nursing Narrativessource: Nursing Narratives
published: Jan 2021

In the first month of the UK lockdown, 72% of the NHS and social care staff who died were from BME backgrounds. Nursing Narratives: Racism and the Pandemic is a collaborative project that will use documentary film and writing to amplify the experiences and perspectives of black and minority ethnic health workers.

Black and migrant nurses and care staff have made a critical contribution to the NHS and social care. But the current coronavirus outbreak has laid bare structural inequalities.

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Exclusions lead to criminalisation of London black working class

Youth Protesterssource: SalehMamon.com
published: 25 November 2020

It has been common knowledge for decades that black youth are disproportionately excluded from school permanently.

No significant progress has been made to significantly change this reality in spite of many reports. The most recent data show that black pupils are nearly four times more likely to be permanently excluded than their school peers.

The London case study by Jessica Perera of the Institute of Race Relations is ground breaking. It shows that exclusions and criminalisation of black working class youth are not isolated issues that should be confined to school level without relating them to wider social and political developments over five decades.

In response to the media and commentators who deliberately sensationalise serious black youth crime by projecting black youth as a menace and racialising it, Perera reviews the evidence thoroughly to present a more nuanced view.

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